Three more in hospital after eating mussels

The Star, 15 Feb 2013

KOTA KINABALU: Three more people were warded at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital here after consuming red tide-infected toxic mussels, bringing the number of victims to 46.

The health department expects more people who had bought the mussels at the Inanem night market here to come forward for treatment.

The red tide phenomenon claimed its third victim on Wednesday when a 23-year-old foreigner from Kampung Inanam Jaya died from suspected poisoning after consuming shellfish bought at the market.

The shellfish was said to have been sold at just RM1.50 per plastic bag.

Sabah health department director Dr Christina Rundi said: “We don’t know how many people actually consumed the clams but we advise those who ate them to seek treatment, whether or not they have symptoms.”

The initial symptoms include tingling lips and tongue, a sensation of “pins and needles” on the skin, followed by loss of control of arms and legs, and breathing difficulty.

The red tide warning was first issued by the Fisheries Department on Dec 12 last year.

The phenomenon is triggered by a deadly algae bloom, which produces toxic or harmful effects to marine life and turns the water red.

Source

One dead, 17 hospitalised after eating ‘red tide’ mussels

The Star, 13 Feb 2013

Mussle

KOTA KINABALU: A man died and 17 others were hospitalised after consuming mussels and bivalves infected with red tide toxins, in the most serious case of paralystic shellfish poisoning (PSP) this season.

Sabah Fisheries Department director Rayner Stuel Galid said his department received a report from the State Health Department about the latest incident.

The victims had all purchased cockles and bivalves from street peddlers at the Inanam market, Galid said in a statement on Wednesday.

He said the red tide warning was still in place and urged the public to avoid consuming all types of marine shellfish or bivalves.

These include sea oysters, mussels, cockles, bivalves and any type of clam-like seafood.

Beginning late November, the department detected a high amount of PSP toxins in samples of bivalves obtained from the west coast through its red tide monitoring programme.

In January, two teenagers died from consuming poisonous shellfish.

Among the initial symptoms include tingling lips and tongue, a sensation of the ‘pins and needles’ on the skin, followed by loss of control of arms and legs, and difficulty breathing that could result in death.

Source